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CATHOLIC THEOLOGICAL UNION 
AT CHICAGO 




ANNOUNCEMENTS 

1968-1969 



The Franciscans 

Sacred Heart Province 
The Passionists 

Holy Cross Province 
The Servites 

American Provinces 



5401 South Cornell Avenue 

Chicago, Illinois 60615 

(312) 324-8000 









3 1 ^ ^ 3 ^t^K^ 












TABLE OF CONTENTS 




4 CALENDAR 

5 A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 
7 GENERAL INFORMATION 

13 ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 

19 ACADEMIC PROGRAM 



CALENDAR 1968-1969 



FALL QUARTER 1968 

September 19-20 
September 30 
October 1 
October 4 
November 1 

November 28-December 1 
December 2 
December 18 



Registration 

Opening of the Academic Year 
Classes Begin 
St. Francis Day 
All Saints Day 
Thanksgiving Recess 
Registration for winter Quarter 
Fall Quarter Ends 



WINTER QUARTER 1969 

January 6 
January 7 
February 12 
March 3 
March 19 



Registration for New Students 
Classes Begin 
Servite Founders' Day 
Registration for Spring Quarter 
Winter Quarter Ends 



SPRING QUARTER 1969 

March 24 
March 25 
April 3-12 
April 28 
May 15 
June 13 
June 15 



Registration for New Students 

Classes Begin 

Easter Recess 

St. Paul's Day 

Ascension Thursday 

Quarter Ends 

Final Convocation 



A MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT 



In his book, The Seminary, Protestant and Catholic, Walter D. 
Wagoner, Director-Elect of the Boston Theological Institute, 
writes: "The obvious surfeit of seminaries might well be rectified, 
then, in three different ways: 1. Merge and move many present semi- 
naries into clusters or theological consortiums. 2. Shift a substantial 
number of seminaries into vital and geographical close relation with 
a few of the better Catholic universities. 3. Make every effort to 
establish at least three or four of the very best seminaries along- 
side an equal number of the great secular universities." 

The Catholic Theological Union is envisioned as a Catholic re- 
sponse to the need for seminary education in our age and in the con- 
text of Mr. Wagoner's third proposal. There is an almost unique 
opportunity for excellence in theological training in the environs of 
the University of Chicago. Everything is here. The City of Chicago 
with all its educational and cultural resources. A great secular uni- 
versity, one moreover, with a renowned Divinity School, staffed by 
scholars of eminence. There is opportunity for ecumenical contact, 
not only with the Divinity School, but also with the sister seminaries 
nearby. They are much interested in cooperation with the Catholic 
Theological Union. In fact, it is entirely possible that a theological 
consortium will eventually be established. Then too, there are op- 
portunities for a variety of field programs and apostolic experiences 
available to the students of CTU. It was for these reasons that the 
Catholic Theological Union was located near the University of 
Chicago. 

The faculty at the new school of theology will be unusually strong. 
Among the professors will be such scholars as Barnabas M. Ahem, 
Dismas Bonner, Dominic Crossan, and Carroll Stuhlmueller. As the 
Union develops it is expected that new members will offer their best 
scholars to this faculty. 

The CTU library is excellent in depth and quality. And the library 
resources in the immediate area, both theological and general, are 
most impressive. 

We feel, therefore, that we have laid the foundations for a truly 
great school of theology. And yet much building remains to be 
done on these foundations. 



Our corporate charter makes provision for full membership in the 
Catholic Theological Union of groups other than the Franciscans, 
Passionists and Servites. Membership brings with it the right to 
a voice in school policy through representatives on the Board of 
Trustees. Competent scholars of communities which become mem- 
bers of the Catholic Theological Union will be offered a position 
on the faculty. Those who do not wish to become formal members 
of the CTU can send students on a tuitional basis. A large number 
of religious communities have expressed interest in our venture. 
The first group which has given us a vote of confidence is the 
Norbertine Fathers of St. Norbert Abbey, De Pere, Wisconsin. They 
will send several students to CTU this coming fall. A second group, 
the Augustinian Fathers, have enrolled their students in theology 
at CTU. They will commute each day from their seminary college 
south of Chicago. It is hoped that eventually both the Norbertines 
and the Augustinians will become full members of the Catholic 
Theological Union. 

Living arrangements are entirely optional for members of CTU. 
A seminary which intends moving from its present location might 
well consider purchasing a building of a size to serve its needs in 
the vicinity of CTU. Some groups are considering enrolling a small 
number of students who would live with their director of formation 
in an apartment or large house. Fluidity is the watchword here. 

It is our plan, once we know the eventual size and shape of the 
Catholic Theological Union, to construct an academic facility ad- 
jacent to the campus of the university. And we have the assurance 
of university authorities that our presence is most welcome. 

Several years of intensive planning have gone into the organiza- 
tion of this venture. Other communities are now invited to share 
in our work. We feel that the fruitful future of theological educa- 
tion lies in the direction we are taking. We invite your inquiries. 
The answer to your desire for excellent and creative theological 
education might well be found in membership in the Catholic Theo- 
logical Union at Chicago. 



Sincerely yours, 

Paul I. Bechtold, C.P. 

President 

Catholic Theological Union 



GENERAL INFORMATION 




PURPOSE AND HISTORY 



ACCREDITATION 



BUILDING AND LOCATION 



LIBRARY 



CLASSROOM FACILITIES 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES 



FEES 



PURPOSE AND HISTORY 



The Catholic Theological Union at Chicago can truly be called a 
product of Vatican II. The trends in the Catholic Church which 
were reflected in the Council and blessed by it make a new approach 
to seminary training imperative. Both the spirit and the letter of 
such documents as that on Priestly Training, Ecumenism and the 
Church In The Modern World, high-light the necessity of theologi- 
cal training being given in an open and ecumenical setting. 

During the past decade, too. Catholic educators have been in- 
creasingly vocal in pointing out that an isolated, understaffed and 
unaccredited theological seminary cannot possibly give the theologi- 
cal education demanded by the priestly ministry of today and to- 
morrow. In a recent survey, of 381 Catholic major seminaries in the 
United States, 166 (4l%) had fewer than 50 students. Increasingly, 
educators have suggested that Catholic seminaries combine their 
resources in library and faculty and if possible move into living con- 
tact with the universiy and other seminaries. 

Nor has this been exclusively a Roman Catholic concern. Protes- 
tant seminary professors and administrators have long been aware 
of "the problem of the small seminary." In the report, Ministry 
For Tomorrow, the Special Committee on Theological Education of 
the Episcopal Church calls for the re-location of seminaries in an 
urban setting, in contact with seminaries of other faiths, and near 
a university. 

In May, 1964, Cardinal Suenens visited the University of Chicago 
for a series of lectures and ecumenical dialogue. As a result of the 
good spirit engendered by his visit. Dean Jerald Brauer of the 
Divinity School of the University of Chicago, met with Father 
Kieran Conley, a Benedictine of the St. Meinrad School of Theology, 
and Father Dominic Crossan, a Servite from Stonebridge Priory at 
Lake Bluff, Illinois, to discuss the possibility of a Catholic seminary 
locating near the campus. Such a move was seen to have exciting 
possibilities. Besides the Divinity School of the University, three 
Protestant theological schools are located on or near the campus. The 
opportunities for scholarly collaboration and ecumenical cooperation 
are at once evident. A third group, the Passionist Fathers, became 
interested in the idea inasmuch as they were about to merge their 
Louisville theologate with the St. Meinrad School of Theology. 



In October, 1964, representatives of the three orders met with 
Dean Brauer and members of the faculty of the Divinity School. 
The meeting was highly successful. Cardinal Meyer was approached 
early in 1965 and took the matter under advisement. His untimely 
death brought conversations to a temporary halt. Shortly after Arch- 
bishop John P. Cody had been appointed to Chicago he was apprised 
of the plans. By this time, 1965, the Benedictines had withdrawn 
from the venture. However, the Franciscan Fathers of Sacred Heart 
Province had decided to join the Servites and the Passionists. 

The Franciscans had conducted St. Joseph Seminary at Teutopolis, 
Illinois, since 1862. The Servite seminary at Lake Bluff, Illinois, 
was successor to the first Servite seminary in Chicago dating from 
1880. The Passionists had begun theological training in St. Louis 
in 1906. 

In January, 1967, Cardinal Cody gave his approval for the estab- 
lishment of a combined seminary of the three orders near the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. An organizational committee now moved the 
plans ahead rapidly. Committees for curriculum, spiritual formation, 
administration and real estate were set up at a joint meeting of the 
three faculties at Teutopolis in May, 1967. A Board of Trustees 
from the three orders was selected and on August 25, 1967, elected 
Rev. Paul I. Bechtold, C.P., first president of the school. At a 
second general meeting held at Lake Bluff in September, the shape 
of the curriculum and problems of staffing were settled. Definite 
structure resulted when the State of Illinois granted corporate status 
to the school on November 27, 1967, under title of The Catholic 
Theological Union At Chicago. 

Intensive real estate search in the neighborhood of the University 
of Chicago had narrowed attention to three possible sites. In Feb- 
ruary, 1968, it was decided to purchase the Aragon Hotel, 5401 
Cornell, in East Hyde Park, a location about one mile from the 
campus. This would serve as a temporary home for the Catholic 
Theological Union. Plans call for an academic facility to be con- 
structed at the campus at some future date. Title to the Aragon was 
taken on April 2, 1968. The 185 room hotel will comfortably house 
the 115 students and 25 faculty members who are expected in 
September. 

Because of the excellent location of the Catholic Theological 
Union and the trend among Catholic seminaries to combine resources 
and move intO' relationship with the university, there is good reason 

10 



to believe that this venture will prove to be a significant break- 
through in Catholic seminary education. 



ACCREDITATION 

The Catholic Theological Union is incorporated in the State 
of Illinois as an institution of higher learning. By corporate charter 
it will be empowered to grant appropriate degrees. Furthermore, 
conversation has already begun with the American Association of 
Theological Schools and with the North Central Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools regarding accreditation on both 
professional and academic levels. 



BUILDING AND LOCATION 

The Catholic Theological Union occupies a nine-story building 
containing some 185 rooms plus lounge areas and dining facilities. 
On the first floor are the receptionist's offices, a large lounge, the 
dining room and other service areas. The administrative offices, 
facult^^ offices, faculty lounge and seminar rooms are located on the 
second floor. The library and library offices occupy the entire third 
floor. The remaining six floors furnish residence for the faculty and 
students, with individual community chapels and recreational facili- 
ties. 

The Catholic Theological Union is located in the Hyde Park- 
Kenwood area of Chicago's South side, only fifteen minutes by car 
or train from center-city. It is close to the University of Chicago 
and to the several schools of theology in the area (Chicago Theo- 
logical Seminary, Lutheran School of Theology and Meadville 
Theological Seminary). 



LIBRARY 

The entire third floor of The Catholic Theological Union houses 
the library. The area has been renovated to contain a large reading 

11 



and reference room. Besides offices for the library staff, there will 
be cataloging and other work rooms. 

The present collection consists of about 70,000 volumes, a com- 
bination of the libraries of the previously independent theologates 
of two of the charter members of CTU. Virtually all the neces- 
sary periodicals for theological study and related areas of research 
are currently being received. 

The proximity of the libraries of the other theological schools 
in the area and of the library of the University of Chicago, especially 
of the Divinity School and the Oriental Institute, furnish broad and 
valuable possibilities for consultation and research. 



CLASSROOM FACILITIES 

Arrangements have been made with the Chicago Sinai Congrega- 
tion, 5350 South Shore Drive, approximately one block from CTU, 
to rent classrooms for the coming academic year. In addition, a num- 
ber of seminar rooms for smaller groups have been made available 
in the CTU building. These facilities are adequate for our academic 
needs for the immediate future. 



ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

The Lake Michigan beaches and the area parks with golf and 
tennis facilities are within easy walking distance from CTU. An 
arrangement has been worked out whereby the athletic facilities of 
the Hyde Park YMCA will be available to students of the Catholic 
Theological Union. 



FEES 

Tuition $1,200.00 per year 

400.00 per quarter 
Board (September 1 - June 15) 750.00 

250.00 per quarter 
Room (September 1 - June 15) 750.00 

250.00 per quarter 

12 



ADMINISTRATION AND FACULTY 




OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 



FACULTY 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



President Rev. Paul I. Bechtold, C.P., M.A. 

Vice President and Dean Rev. Hugh T. McElwain, O.S.M., 

S.T.D. 



Secretary and Treasurer 
Librarian 



Rev. James Hartke, O.F.M., M.B.A. 

Rev. Myron Gohmann, C.P., L.H.E., 
M.L.S. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Very Rev. Germain Schwab, O.F.M., S.T.D. 

Very Rev. Terence O'Connor, O.S.M., M.A., S.T.D. 

Very Rev. Paul M. Boyle, C.P., S.T.L., J.C.L. 

Very Rev. Stephen M. Ryan, O.S.M., M.A. 

Rev. Mark Hegener, O.F.M., M.A. 

Rev. James Hartke, O.F.M., M.B.A. 

Rev. Conleth Overman, C.P., M.A. 



DIRECTORS OF FORMATION 

Rev. Dismas Bonner, O.F.M., J.C.D. 
Rev. Bernard Curran, C.P., M.A. 
Rev. Francis X. Keenan, C.P. 
Rev. John Leahy, O.S.M., S.T.D. 



15 





FACULTY 




AHERN, Rev. Barnabas, C.P. 

S.T.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

S.S.L. Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome 

S.S.D. Ibid. 

LL.D. University of Notre Dame (Honorary) 


BEHNEN, 
S.T.L. 
S.T.D. 
L.G. 


Rev. Max, O.F.M. 

Pontifical Athenaeum "Antonianum, 

Ibid. 

Ibid. 


Rome 


BONNER, 
J.C.L. 
J.C.D. 


Rev. Dismas, O.F.M. 

The Catholic University of America, 
Ibid. 


Washington 



BORNTRAGER, Rev. Conrad, O.S.M. 

S.T.L. Pontifical Theological Faculty "Marianum," Rome 
M.A. (Missiology) The Catholic University of America 

Lie. in Hist. University of Louvain, Louvain, Belgium 

BRENNAN, Rev. Walter, O.S.M. 

M.A. DePaul University, Chicago 

Graduate Studies, University of Chicago 
Ph.D. (Cand.) DePaul University, Chicago 

CROSSAN, Rev. Dominic, O.S.M. 

S.T.L. Maynooth College, National University of Ireland 
S.T.D. Ibid. 

S.S.L. Pontifical Institute of Biblical Studies, Rome 

Eleve Titulaire de I'Ecole Biblique, Jerusalem, Jordan 

CUNNINGHAM, Rev. Thomas, O.S.M. 

J.C.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

J.C.D. Ibid. 

FOURNELLE, Rev. Geron, O.F.M. 

S.T.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 
L.G. Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Rome 

S.S.L. Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome 

16 



GOHMANN, Rev. Myron, C.P. 

L.H.E. Gregorian University, Rome 

M.L.S. Rosary College, River Forest, Illinois 

HAYES, Rev. Zachary, O.F.M. 

S.T.L. Friederich-Wilhelm University, Bonn, Germany 

S.T.D. Ibid. 

LANGERHOLZ, Rev. Callistus, O.F.M. 

S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum "Antonianum," Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 
L.G. Ibid. 

LEAHY, Rev. John, O.S.M. 

S.T.L. Pontifical Theological Faculty "Marianum," Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 

Graduate Studies, Loyola University, Chicago 

MacDONALD, Rev. Sebastian, C.P. 

S.T.L. Pontifical University "Angelicum," Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 

MATHIS, Rev. Marcian, O.F.M. 

J.C.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

J.C.D. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

McELWAIN, Rev. Hugh, O.S.M. 

S.T.L. Pontifical Theological Faculty "Marianum," Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 

Graduate Studies in Education, DePaul University, 

Chicago 

MICHELS, Sister Florence, O.L.V.M. 

A.B. Immaculate Heart College, Los Angeles 

M.S.S.W. The Catholic University of America, Washington 
Diploma Lumen Vitae, Brussels, Belgium 
Ph.D. The Catholic University of America, Washington 

NEWBOLD, Rev. Thomas M., C.P. 

Maitre-es-Sc-Med. L'Institut d'Etude Medievale d'Albert le 

Grand 
Ph.D. University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada 

17 



OSTDIEK, Rev. Gilbert, O.F.M. 

S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum "Antonianum," Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 
L.G. Ibid. 

PAWLIKOWSKI, Rev. John, O.S.M. 

A.B. Loyola University, Chicago 

Graduate Studies, University of Chicago 

(Ph.D. Cand.). 
Diploma in Jewish Studies, Institute of Jewish Studies, 

Wheeling College 

PERA, Rev. Sylvano, O.F.M. 

S.T.L. Pontifical Athenaeum "Antonianum," Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 
L.G. Ibid. 

RANKIN, Rev. Barry, C.P. 

S.T.L. Pontifical University "Angelicum," Rome 
S.T.D. Ibid. 

SCHMITT, Rev. William, O.F.M. 

B.A. Quincy College 

Graduate Study, Northwestern University 

STUHLMUELLER, Rev. Carroll, C.P. 

S.T.L. The Catholic University of America, Washington 
S.S.L. The Pontifical Biblical Institute, Rome 

S.S.D. Ibid. 



18 



ACADEMIC PROGRAM 




ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



APPLYING FOR ADMISSION 



CURRICULUM 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 



Students applying for admission at the Catholic Theological 
Union must have a bachelor's degree from a recognized college or 
university. Beyond this the Committee on Admissions prefers to 
evaluate each applicant on an individual basis. An oral interview 
with the prospective student will be required, unless he is sponsored 
by a participating religious community. 

Pre- theological studies are the subject of much discussion and 
revision at the present time. Roman Catholic pre- theological educa- 
tion has always emphasized the need for a strong background in the 
humanities with special emphasis on scholastic philosophy. For the 
larger Christian theological community the Statement on Pre-Semi- 
nary Studies, adopted by the American Association of Theological 
Schools, furnishes significant guidelines. 

Traditionally, theological schools in America have expected 
their students to prepare themselves for theological study by 
a broad undergraduate program in the liberal arts. When it 
came to a choice of concentration, students were often encour- 
aged to major in classical languages, history or philosophy. 

Today, however, because of the wide range of undergraduate 
programs and majors offered by a great diversity of institu- 
tions of higher education, it is no longer feasible nor realistic to 
demand one particular type of undergraduate preparation as a 
prerequisite for theological study. Some of the ablest students 
in our theological schools have made their decision to prepare 
for the ministry after their undergraduate study was completed, 
or even after a period of time in an occupation apparently un- 
connected with the Church's ministry. 

In every case, the student contemplating theological study 
should correspond at the very earliest opportunity with the 
school or schools to which he intends to apply and with the 
authorities of his church in order to learn what will best pre- 
pare him for the specific program he intends to enter. It is 
the judgment of the A ATS that a normative pattern of pre- 
seminary studies will include many of the following: 

21 



English language and literature; history, including non- 
western cultures as well as European and American; philos- 
ophy, particularly its history and methods; natural sciences, 
both the physical and the life sciences; social sciences, where 
psychology, sociology and anthropology are especially appro- 
priate; the fine arts and music, especially for their creative and 
symbolic values; biblical and modern languages; religion, 
both in the Judaeo-Christian and in the Near and Far Eastern 
traditions. 

Some seminaries require Greek or Hebrew for admission, 
and many advanced biblical courses are offered in the original 
tongues; modern languages have an immensely educative role 
and are required at the graduate studies level. 

In many seminaries students who have been well prepared 
in religion and equipped with the tools of theological study 
will be set free, not to complete their theological courses more 
quickly, but rather to pursue more advanced studies. The prin- 
ciple constantly to be kept in mind is not that of satisfying 
paper regulations and minimum requirements, but of making 
the most of opportimities for education. 

This statement, adopted by the Association after considera- 
tion and study by its membership, is issued for the guidance of 
persons considering application to a seminary and their ad- 
visors. In no way does it bind or limit the seminaries in their 
admissions policies. Each seminary is free to set its own en- 
trance and make-up requirements, to add to this statement or 
change its emphases. (AATS, Bulletin 27, June, 1966, pp. 35-6, 
passim.) 



APPLYING FOR ADMISSION 

Students enrolling at the Catholic Theological Union should 
present the following documents, which should be in the office of 
the Dean of Studies by the end of the senior year in college or four 
months before entrance into CTU: 

1) a formal application for admission to be obtained from the 
Dean's office; 2) transcripts of all college or academic work after 
high school, including novitiate and summer sessions; 3) a check or 
money order in the amount of $10.00 in payment of application fee. 

22 



CURRICULUM 



INTRODUCTION 

Curriculum is an area of continuing thought and imagination in 
any academic program. And curriculum design has been a prominent 
concern in the organizational discussion of the faculties of the three 
Charter Members of the Catholic Theological Union. Founding a 
new school offered them the possibility of creative innovation in 
curriculum. 

The two poles of tension during most of the discussion were the 
historical approach as the unifying element in curriculum design 
as opposed to the theme centered approach. The questions which 
emerged were basically two, therefore: whether theology should 
be done primarily in terms of historical development, wherein themes 
were seen to emerge, or whether theology should be done with 
primary attention to themes, but seen always in their historical 
perspective. 

The combined faculty of the Catholic Theological Union finally 
decided that it would be premature to settle on a philosophy of 
curriculum previous to the experience of living together in dialogue 
as a single faculty. It was agreed, therefore, that teachers would 
be given the option of either methodology, with dialogue continuing 
on this critical area during the course of the academic year. 

A second area of discussion among the members of the CTU 
faculty was the orientation of the curriculum in view of a diversified 
student population, since there is the desire eventually to open the 
program to lay students as well as clerics. The problem, therefore, 
focussed on the relationship between graduate theology and pro- 
fessional studies for the ministry. Again, without cutting off con- 
tinuing dialogue on this central issue, a compromise solution was 
adopted. Three general areas of curricular structure were defined: 
prerequisite courses for graduate theology (called Lower Division 
Courses), secondly, courses leading to a graduate degree in theology 
(M.A.), and, finally, courses required for priestly ministry in the 
Roman Catholic ecclesial community. All three areas are reflected 
in the design of the curriculum. 

23 



FIELD WORK 

A variety of possibilities for apostolic or field work is being ex- 
plored by the Directors of Apostolic Work at the Catholic Theo- 
logical Union. These include hospital chaplaincies, the inner city 
apostolate, radio and television communications, catechetical and 
youth counselling programs. It is planned that field programs will 
be under expert supervision and will tie in closely with the academic 
curriculum. The experience of a years residence in the area is a 
prerequisite before these apostolic programs are included in the 
catalogue of the Catholic Theological Union. 



DEGREE PROGRAMS 

The Catholic Theological Union, in conversation with the Ameri- 
can Association of Theological Schools and the North Central Asso- 
ciation of Colleges and Secondary Schools, envisions two kinds of 
degree programs, that is, a professional degree in ministry, generally 
called the Master of Divinity (M. Div.) or Bachelor of Divinity 
(B.D.), but always considered the first professional degree; and an 
academic degree, namely, the Master of Arts in Theology (M.A.), 
following generally the first graduate degree program in most 
American universities. 



MASTER OF DIVINITY (M. Div.) 

The degree of Master of Divinity, more frequently called the 
B.D. in the standard AATS theological program, is the first profes- 
sional degree in ministry. The Master of Divinity requires three 
years of theology, covering all the areas of theological education, 
that is, the fields of Biblical study, of Historical and Doctrinal 
studies and of Christian Ethics and Ministry. 

CTU is suggesting a program of core courses for the M. Div. de- 
gree which will be taught every year. There is an equal number of 
seminars offered each year to build a certain flexibility into this degree 
program, since each community and individuals within the several 
communities are engaged in a variety of ministries. 

24 



The Master of Divinity degree is earned by the successful com- 
pletion of nine quarters or 33 courses from the curricular offerings, 
with a grade average of "C" or better. The courses are detailed 
as follows: 

8 Courses from the Dept. of Biblical Studies 26 units* 

9 Courses from the Dept. of Historical-Doctrinal Studies 30 units* 

8 Courses from the Dept. of Ethics & Ministry 26 units* 

8 Elective courses or seminars 20 units* 

102 units* 



MASTER OF ARTS DEGREE (M.A.) 

The Master of Arts degree in theology is a strictly academic de- 
gree and follows the ordinary pattern of graduate work in universi- 
ties generally. 

requirements: The candidate must be admitted to the graduate 
program, which requires, besides the bachelor's degree from a recog- 
nized university or college, at least nine courses (36 units or 24 
semester hours) of undergraduate theology or lower division courses 
in our curriculum design. Of these two must be from the department 
of Biblical Studies, three in Historical-Doctrinal Studies and two 
in Christian Ethics «& Ministry. 

LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT: Besides possessing a reading knowledge 
of Latin, the candidate must be proficient in a modern language. 
Specialization in a particular Department may indicate another lan- 
guage requirement. This is especially true in the area of biblical 
studies. 

courses: Twelve courses plus a thesis are required. All of these 
courses must be taken from the upper division offerings: It will be 
necessary for the candidate to major in one of the three areas or de- 
partments of the theological curriculum, that is, biblical studies, 
historical-doctrinal studies or christian ethics and ministry. The can- 
didate is required to take six courses in his area of specialization, 
and of these, at least two courses must be from the 300 series. The 
Master's program will have a certain flexibility and will be developed 
through consultation between the student and his faculty advisor. 
Finally, the student must carry a "B" average in his course work. 



* A "unit" in this Catalogue is a quarter hour, that is, one 50 minute class 
per week for ten weeks. All lower division courses are 4 unit courses. The 
upper division courses are 3 unit courses. Seminars are 2 unit courses. 

25 



THESIS : The candidate must present a thesis which indicates indepth 
study in some aspect of his major field or area of concentration. The 
thesis should conform to the characteristics of research and indepen- 
dent thought. It must follow the accepted norms of literary style 
for research papers. 

FINAL examination: After the thesis has been read and approved 
by the designated reader, the candidate must take a final com- 
prehensive examination. 



COURSE OFFERINGS 



The courses to be offered during the academic years 1968-1969 
and 1969-1970 are listed below. Three departments make up the 
school of theology of the Catholic Theological Union: the Depart- 
ment of Biblical Literature and Languages, the Department of His- 
torical and Doctrinal Studies, and the Department of Christian 
Ethics and Ministry. There are two levels of instruction offered by 
each department, lower division courses (4 unit courses) and upper 
division courses, which may be either courses (3 units) or seminars 
(2 units). 



A. DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND LANGUAGES 
(BLL) 

Staff: Geron Fournelle (Chairman), Barnabas Ahern, Dominic Crossan, 
Callistus Langerholz, Carroll Stuhlmueller. 



1. LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

BLL 100: INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE 

The Bible as the word of man and of God. Composition of the Bible: 
oral tradition, written documents, "Sitz im Leben," literary genres, in- 
spiration, hermeneutics. FOURNELLE 



BLL 105: INTRODUCTION TO THE NEW TESTAMENT 

Investigation into the background of the New Testament writing in the 
Jewish, Greek and Roman world of their time. CROSSAN 

26 



2. UPPER DIVISION COURSES 



BLL 200: HISTORICAL-EXEGETICAL STUDY OF THE 
PENTATEUCH 

Historical background of the Old Testament milieu. Hebrew position in 
the world picture. Exegesis of Genesis 1-11. Patriarchal narratives. 
Exodus event as central tj the understanding of the O.T. 

FOURNELLE 



BLL 205: THE HISTORY OF THE HEBREW PEOPLE 

History of the Hebrew people from the conquest through Solomon, 
stressing the developing consciousness of the people and their role in 
the light of historical developments. FOURNELLE 

BLL 210: THE PROPHETIC CONTRIBUTION TO BIBLICAL 
RELIGION 

The historical origin of the prophetic challenge within the Ancient Near 
East. Dominant characteristics of the prophetic movement and the 
variety of its manifestations in the pre-exilic prophets Relation of the 
prophets to the cult of their time and to the worship of later ages. 

STUHLMUELLER 



BLL 215: EVOLVING FORM OF PROPHETISM DURING THE 
EXILE AND POSTEXILIC PERIODS 

The salient role of Ezekiel and Deutero-Isaiah during the pivotal period 
of the exile. Later subservience of the prophetic movement to priestly 
legalism or to the apocalyptic form of postexilic Judaism. 

STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 220: THE PSALMS 

The psalms investigated against the background of biblical religion and 
the other eastern religions. Various literary types. The psalms as rep- 
resentative of major religious movements in Israel. STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 225: OLD TESTAMENT WISDOM LITERATURE 

The wisdom movement in Israel and the ancient Near East. Problems of 
the "wise men." Retribution considered as thematic to study. Introduc- 
tion to the pseudoepigrapha, relating their future life treatment to 
Wisdom Literature. FOURNELLE 

BLL 230: THE SYNOPTICS: MATTHEW AND MARK 
The structure, theology and dominant themes of Mark and Matthew as 
well as their literary relationship and situation in the primitive com- 
munity. CROSSAN 

27 



BLL 235: LUKE AND THE ACTS OF THE APOSTLES 

The compositional relation and theological unity of Luke-Acts, and the 
dialectic of faith and history in the two writings. CROSSAN 

BLL 240: THE GOSPEL OF JOHN 

Exegesis of John's original text, exposing his style, symbolism, structure 
and theology. LANGERHOLZ 

BLL 245: JOHANNINE LITERATURE 

A detailed exegetical study of John's letters, pointing up the concept of 
God, Christ, agape. Christian existence and the Christian community. 

LANGERHOLZ 

BLL 250: PAULINE THEOLOGY 

Origin of main Pauline themes in the apostle's personal character and 
judaic background as well as in his struggles with the early church. 
Development of thought in 1-2 Thes, 1-2 Cor, Gal, Rom, Phil. 

AHERN 

BLL 255: PAULINE SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT 

The relation of the captivity and pastoral epistles, as well as the Epistle 
to the Hebrews, with other Pauline letters. Doctrinal developments 
within the main schools of Pauline thought. AHERN 

BLL 302: SEMINAR: THE HISTORY OF EXEGESIS 

Studies in selected periods of exegesis with emphasis on hermeneutical 

principles involved and interpretative intentions of the exegetes. 

CROSSAN 

BLL 304: SEMINAR: THE BIBLE AND TEXTUAL CRITICISM 

History and transmission of the biblical text. Textual errors and their 
correction. Exercises in textual emendation. FOURNELLE 

BLL 306: SEMINAR: CREATIVE REDEMPTION IN DEUTERO- 

ISAIAH 
An indepth study of Is 40-55, emphasizing the transformation of earlier 
redemptive themes or of the prophet's special insights into an announce- 
ment of a new creation. Literary forms in Deutero-Isaiah. 

STUHLMUELLER 

BLL 308: SEMINAR: OLD TESTAMENT MESSIANISM 
Formative historical factors in the development of personal messianism. 

LANGERHOLZ 

BLL 310: SEMINAR: STUDIES IN RABBINICS 

An introduction to Jewish traditions, their teaching and their haggada 
through their history, leading to an understanding of modern Judaism 
and an ecumenical approach to the Synagogue. LANGERHOLZ 

28 



BLL 312: SEMINAR: EMPTY TOMB AND RISEN LORD 

An investigation into the meaning and intention of credal statements 
concerning the resurrection. Detailed exegesis of texts concerning the 
empty tomb and risen presence of Jesus to others. CROSS AN 

BLL 314: SEMINAR: CHRIST'S PRIESTHOOD IN THE EPISTLE 
TO THE HEBREWS 

The nature of Christ's priesthood as emerging from the attitude of the 
Epistle to the Hebrews towards Jesus' earthly life and glorification as 
well as towards New Testament worship. AHERN 

BLL 316: SEMINAR: EUAGGELION IN PAULINE LETTERS 

The notion of "euaggelion" together with the pastoral principles of 
the Pauline letters. LANGERHOLZ 

BLL 318: SEMINAR: INTERTESTAMENTAL LITERATURE 
Historico-cultural-religious developments of the period. The Pseude- 
pigrapha and their influence on the religion and aspiration of the 
Jewish nation. Qumran. FOURNELLE 

N.B. Courses in biblical languages have not been Hsted. Offerings in 
the biblical languages will be made according to the needs of the students 
and the requirements of the Department. 



B. DEPARTMENT OF HISTORICAL AND DOCTRINAL STUDIES 
IHDS) 

Staff: Zachary Hayes (Chairman), Walter Brennan, Conrad Borntrager, John 
Leahy, Hugh McElwain, Gilbert Ostdiek, Sylvano Pera, Barry Rankin. 

1. LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

HDS 100: RELIGION AND CULTURE 

A study of human religiousness as a cultural event on the level of cul- 
ture in general, tradition in culture, and personal freedom in culture. 

BRENNAN 

HDS 105: SURVEY OF CHURCH HISTORY 

A summary of the major events, trends and leaders from primitive 
Catholicism to the present. PERA 

HDS 110: THEOLOGICAL REFLECTION: PURPOSE AND 
NATURE 

A study of the sources, method and function of theological reflection 
with particular emphasis on the historical revelation of Christianity^ and 
the developing awareness in response of the community^ of faith. 

HAYES 

29 



HDS 115: THEOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 

An investigation into the meaning of man in his total situation, including 
its religious dimension, as seen from the evolutionary perspective and 
the dynamics of process. McELWAIN 

HDS 120: THE MYSTERY OF CHRIST 

A study of the development of Christological doctrines from biblical, 
historical and contemporary perspectives. RANKIN 

HDS 125: MINISTRY IN THE CHURCH 

Ministry is a function in the Church. To understand ministry one must 
understand the organization in which it operates. This course develops 
a notion of the Church to which its ministry responds. LEAHY 

HDS 130: THEOLOGY OF WORSHIP 

An introductory study of the nature and structure of liturgical celebra- 
tion. OSTDIEK 



2. UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

HDS 200: HISTORY OF RELIGIONS I: PHENOMENOLOGY OF 
RELIGIONS 

A study of the history and development of the modern trend to study 
the category of "the religions" through history and phenomenology. 

BRENNAN 

HDS 205: HISTORY OF RELIGION II: MYTHOLOGY AND 
THEOLOGY 

A study of the meaning and function of myth and logos in man's re- 
sponse to God; especially myths and theologies of creation. 

BRENNAN 

HDS 210: CHRISTIANITY IN THE RENAISSANCE & 
REFORMATION 

Factors influencing the breakdown of the medieval synthesis. Renaissance 
thought and style chiefly in relationship to the Church. Writings of 
the Reformers, and the position of Trent. BORNTRAGER 

HDS 215: THE ECUMENICAL COUNCILS OF VATICAN I & II 

Factors in the 19th century contributing to the positions taken at Vati- 
can I. The action of the various theological and political currents in 
Vatican I will be followed in a parallel fashion with Vatican II. 

BORNTRAGER 

HDS 220: THE CHURCH IN THE 19th CENTURY 

The era of revolutions. Role of the Papacy. Secularization of state 

and society. PERA 

30 



HDS 225: DEVELOPMENT OF CATHOLICISM IN THE U.S. 
Biographical studies. Special problems and achievements of the Ameri- 
can Church. PERA 

HDS 230: THE PROBLEM OF GOD 

A detailed study of the meaning of Christian theistic faith in the light 
of the problems raised by contemporary atheism and scientific develop- 
ments. HAYES 

HDS 235: THEOLOGY OF ORIGINS AND ESCHATOLOGY 

An investigation into the question of origins: of cosmos, of man and 
of sin and evil; correlative study of finality: of cosmos, especially of 
its highest achievement, man. McELWAIN 

HDS 240: THE CHRIST-EVENT AND THE CHRIST-MYTH 
Christ as he emerges in the thought of current theological speculation. 
An evaluation of the movement from the vievc^point of doctrinal history. 

RANKIN 

HDS 245: THEOLOGY OF THE EUCHARIST 

A historico-systematic study of the Eucharist in its liturgical, doctrinal 
and ecclesial dimensions. OSTDIEK 

HDS 250: THEOLOGY OF THE SACRAMENTS I 

Select liturgical and doctrinal questions concerning the history and 

celebration of the sacraments of initiation. OSTDIEK 

HDS 255: THEOLOGY OF THE SACRAMENTS II 
Select liturgical and doctrinal questions concerning the history and cele- 
bration of the sacraments of marriage and reconcilliation (Offered 
1969-70). OSTDIEK 

HDS 302: SEMINAR: THEOLOGY OF HISTORY STAFF 

HDS 304: SEMINAR: HISTORICAL METHODOLOGY 

Meaning of history. Characteristics of the various types of historical 
sources. How historical sources are studied (authenticity, textual criti- 
cism, originality, interpretation, credibility). Historical synthesis. 

BORNTRAGER 

HDS 306: SEMINAR: DEVELOPMENT OF THE CREDAL 
FORMULAS 

A study of the origin and development of the ancient Chriitian Creeds. 

OSTDIEK 

HDS 308: SEMINAR: THEOLOGY OF SIN AND SUFFERING 
A study of the origins and development of the Christian doctrine of 
sin and its implications for the understanding of the human condition. 

HAYES 

31 



HDS 310: SEMINAR: DOCTRINAL DEVELOPMENT 

Consideration of the trends in the theory of doctrinal development from 
Newman to Vatican II. LEAHY 

HDS 312: SEMINAR: WOMEN AND CULTURE 

Woman's position in the world has changed radically in the twentieth 
century. This course will ask whether the cultural view of women 
recognizes her changing position. LEAHY 

HDS 318: SEMINAR: THE THOUGHT OF ST. BONA VENTURE 

A study of the basic structure of the Bonaventurian synthesis and the 
key problems involved in the Christo-centric theology of creation and 
history. HAYES 

HDS 320: SECULAR THEOLOGY 

A study of phenomenon and pervasiveness of secularity in the contempo- 
rary theological writings of respresentative authors. RANKIN 

HDS 322: SEMINAR: CONTEMPORARY DEVELOPMENTS IN 
MARIAN THEOLOGY 

An investigation into the posture of Roman Catholic theology regarding 
the Mother of Jesus in the Vatican II era. (1969-70) McELWAIN 

HDS 326: SEMINAR: ECUMENICAL ECCLESIOLOGY 

Exploration and study of the origins, tenents, practices and structures of 
non-Roman Catholic communions through discussion with their adherents 
in joint colloquy. RANKIN 

HDS 328: SEMINAR: THEOLOGICAL IMPACT OF TEILHARD 
DE CHARDIN 

Discussion of the major writings of Teilhard on the fact of e\'olution 
and the implications for theology, especially in the areas of beginnings 
and Christology. McELWAIN 



C. DEPARTMENT OF CHRISTIAN ETHICS AND MINISTRY 

Staff: Sebastian MacDonald (Chairman), Max Behnen, Dismas Bonner, 
Thomas Cunningham, John Leahy, Marcian Mathis, Thomas M. New- 
bold, John Pawlikowsld, William Schmitt. 

1. LOWER DIVISION COURSES 

CEM 100: DYNAMICS OF CHRISTIAN CONSCIENCE 
FORMATION 

An attempt to disengage the principles operative in the critical con- 
science, especially those that have been neglected, in an effort to relate 
conscience to the problem areas of modern life. MacDONALD 

32 



CEM 105: SOCIAL DIMENSIONS OF CHRISTIAN EXISTENCE 
A consideration of man existence in society, covering such topics as 
personalism and organization man, man and the urban situation, politics 
and prophecy, law and protest. PAWLIKOWSKI 

CEM 110: THEOLOGY AND THE INTERPRETATION OF LAW 

Theological evaluation of the existence of authority in the Church and 
the role of law. Law in relation to Christian freedom. Principles for 
interpretation and implementation of ecclesiastical law. General norms. 

CUNNINGHAM 

CEM 115: INTRODUCTION TO THE SOURCES OF PASTORAL 
PSYCHOLOGY 

An historical survey of the background of contemporary psychotherapy, 
with emphasis on Freud, Jung and the trend toward existential synthesis 
in psychotherapy. NEWBOLD 



2. UPPER DIVISION COURSES 

CEM 200: CHRISTIAN ANTHROPOLOGY AND MORAL 
STRUCTURES 

Relates the doctrine on man developed by prominent figures in Christian 
history to current trends of thought, in order to delineate what is mean- 
ingful and acceptable in modern attitudes and conduct. 

MacDONALD 

CEM 205 : THE SACREDNESS OF LIFE AS A MORAL ABSOLUTE 

The various attempts throughout history to safeguard the moral primacy 
of life will be indicated, in an effort to discern certain critical constants 
essential to its dignity and preservation. MacDONALD 

CEM 210: THEOLOGY OF SEXUALITY 

Changing sexual patterns and thought in America. Meaning of sexuality. 
Marital and premarital sexuality. Particular problems: homosexuality, 
fornication, masturbation. BEHNEN 

CEM 215: LAW CONCERNING THE SACRAMENTS 

A survey of present canonical prescriptions, conciliar norms and pro- 
posed legislation regarding the administration and reception of the 
sacraments. Particular emphasis on matrimonial law and practice. 

MATHIS 

CEM 220: LAW CONCERNING RELIGIOUS PERSONS 

Theological background of rehgious structures and law, current norms 
of law dealing with religious. Principles and practical aspects of reli- 
gious life, its on-going renewal and adaptation. BONNER 

33 



CEM 225: BASIC TYPES OF PASTORAL COUNSELLING 

A discussion of the basic types of pastoral counselling in terms of goals, 
techniques and practice. A presentation and discussion of some typical 
situations in pastoral care. NEWBOLD 

CEM 230: THE WORD ORALLY INTERPRETED 

Textual analysis and performance dynamics involvement of oral inter- 
pretation of literature apphed to Sacred Scripture (homily and reading). 
Practical experience situations in small group sessions and extramural 
audience confrontations. SCHMITT 

CEM 235: THE GOSPEL GOD-MAN ORALLY INTERPRETED 

A specialized course limited to Sunday and seasonal gospels. Textual 
analysis and performance dynamics involvement applied to vitalized 
oral communication. Small group sessions, individual evaluation sessions, 
congregation confrontation sessions. SCHMITT 

CEM 240: THEOLOGY AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

IN THE 70's MICHELS 

CEM 245: MAJOR THEMES IN RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

MICHELS 



CEM 300: SEMINAR: READINGS IN SITUATION ETHICS 

A study of the bases of ethical decision and the various approaches to 
morality. Situationism. The validity of moral absolutes. Existential 
ethics. BEHNEN 

CEM 302: SEMINAR: EXISTENTIAL THEOLOGY AND 
PERSONALITY THEORY 

A consideration of modern personality theorists such as Rogers, Maslow, 
Allport and Erikson. The impHcations of their thought for theological 
construction. PAWLIKOWSKI 



CEM 304: SEMINAR: THEOLOGY OF STRUCTURE AND 
REVOLUTION 

Consideration of the writings of Dorothy Emmet, Hannah Arendt, Leslie 
Dewart, Albert Camus, Crane Brinton, Che Guevara, Charles Hamilton, 
Stokley Carmichael, Theodore Draper. PAWLIKOWSKI 

CEM 306: SEMINAR: THEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF 
FREUD AND JUNG 

A discussion of the Freudian texts on religion and morality. Reading 
and discussion of the texts of Jung on the nature of religious experience. 

NEWBOLD 

34 



CEM 308: SEMINAR: CHRISTIAN DIMENSION OF BUSINESS 
ETHICS 

The role of Protestant and Catholic theology will be documented in its 
attempt to cope with the highly detailed complexities of modern capital- 
ism by means of certain all-inclusive attitudes taken from their respective 
historical traditions. MacDONALD 

CEM 310: SEMINAR: CHURCH-STATE RELATIONS IN 
AMERICAN CONSTITUTIONAL LAW 

A study of the relationship of American church life and structures to 
the principles of the American constitution. Precedent and current 
interpretation by the Supreme Court. MATHIS 

CEM 312: SEMINAR: THE CHRISTIAN ETHICS OF C. S. LEWIS 
Selected readings from the works of C. S. Lewis, with discussion of 
their implications for an understanding of Christian morality. 

NEWBOLD 

CEM 314: SEMINAR: THEOLOGY OF VOCATION 

Vocation seen primarily as Christian, with its working out in the various 
modes of life, single, married, celibate. Religious factors and cultural 
forces in these ways of life. BEHNEN-LEAHY 

CEM 316: SEMINAR: SOURCES OF ECCLESIASTICAL LAW 

A survey and discussion of the principle sources of the law of the 
Church and the contribution of each to the current developments in 
ecclesiastical law. BONNER 

CEM 318: SEMINAR: HISTORY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THE 
INSTITUTIONS OF ECCLESIASTICAL LAW 

Survey and discussion of the history and development of ecclesiastical law. 
The development of ecclesiastical structure, organization and legislation 
from the beginnings of the Church and culminating in the recent 
renewal of law. BONNER 

CEM 320: SEMINAR IN ORIENTAL LAW 

Survey of sources and current practical norms in the Catholic Oriental 
Rites. Ecumenical aspects. MATHIS 



35